A long overdue Top X: The rumours are greatly X-aggerated

Hey all! What’s this, a Top X post? We haven’t had one of those since…holy shit, September 2015. Firstly, on behalf of the hired thugs forcing me to type this on a laptop that’s almost given up the ghost, I’d like to apologise for the lack of content in the House over the last few months. Everyone’s got life stuff and well…yeah. Anyhow, here’s a very long overdue Top X post which if I can get my arse into gear, will be resuming regular broadcasts weekly.

Charging myself with this crusade, I shall chain all my weaponry to myself in case I lose it. The purple robes have been donned and the interns are frantically rushing around fetching me coffee that I won’t actually drink. Not sure if it’s more cost-effective for the house to use saprolings or mechanical constructs to Get Shit Done around the house- the laser defense grid won’t test itself. Where is my coffee anyway?

Enough nattering, onward to the Top X:

The objective for this top X is to bring back the top X, so first up: Over as the Astropate, there’s rumours about an upcoming HeroQuest style Age of Sigmar game- The Silver Tower of Tzeentch. I…actually want to get this game (having mellowed out on AoS. We cool AoS player, we cool) as it sounds like an epic Tower of Power game. Something about fighting through dungeons screams “fantasy” to me, so I’m eager to see how this pans out.

Final boss in the Silver Tower, calling it now.

Final boss in the Silver Tower, calling it now.

Over at GMorts, there’s more unboxings though this time it’s for Raging Heroes, specifically a necropriestess. The flavour text is interesting and is as follows (no copyright infringement intended, etc etc):

The Iron Empire is made up of exiled people that have somehow stumbled upon necromantic knowledge from alien pharaonic gods. They combine Prussian and Germanic influences with some kind of Aegyptian cyber necromancy that allow them to raise the dead and create bio-mechanical aberrations.

The thing to grasp is that Tomb Kings in SPAAAACE *coughnecronscough* left behind plagiarised texts from Nagash during WWI in Prussia. Combining this into an army of Leviticus’? 😛 Considering the Egyptian culture revolved around death and the afterlife, it stands to reason that wargames would have necromancy arising from such places- the late Tomb Kings being an example. She’s got a lot of metal tentacles too, so mayhaps she is the bride-to-be of a certain Xenos?

Meanwhile at Breakthrough Assault, Coxer talks about balancing one’s hobby time and goes into details on how to maximize the effectiveness of available hobby time. Everyone has 24 hours in a day and hobby time is a precious resource.

I had to go looking for an infinity post in the blog network as we need more infinity around the House (No idea what keywords to look for in blog titles) but DocBungle is back on the Infinity wagon, and is playing some AoS and Guild Ball too. From what I’ve heard of it, Guild Ball is great fun though I haven’t seen it played locally.

That wraps it up for now, it’s been a while since the last Top X and the skills are rusty. Nevertheless, the Blog Network Trawler has been located so hopefully better and more eloquently written Top X’s head to a cinema near you (or here-ish, possibly weekly I don’t know)

-The Warlock

 

 

 

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  • MerryVulture

    excellent. I shall happily spend some minutes down the newly uncovered rabbit hole. Thanks Warlock

    • The Warlock

      We need more interns, I forgot to feed the last lot and now some have run away 🙁

  • Cedric Ballbusch

    While I understand mummies and such are a staple of fantasy fiction, and the Ancient Egyptians did place great important on funerary rites I wonder if we don’t do them a disservice by tying them to morbidity and necromancy. With it’s judgement of the soul and promise of eternal life for the righteous. The Book of the Dead makes it clear that Pharaonic religion saw a universe guided by a set of absolute moral principles and believed annihilation was the fate of those who strayed. This is really the first hint of the sort of moralistic, rule-based religious philosophies that would come to dominate civilization 2,000 years after Egypt’s apogee.

    But, Prussian Space-Mummies are cool too.

    • The Warlock

      It’s probably too good an opportunity to pass up for fantasy authors I would think. Instead of merely raising skeletons, there’s a whole culture revolving around the afterlife coupled with relatively different methods of treating a corpse. Not to mention the pyramids, which adds to the wealth of undead fantasy resources that Ancient Egypt provides.

      • Cedric Ballbusch

        That is very true. I want an army of animal mummies myself.

      • Von

        “Instead of merely raising skeletons, there’s a whole culture revolving around the afterlife coupled with relatively different methods of treating a corpse.”

        My homebrew D&D setting has a major religion which runs on exactly that premise. And it’s not faux-Egyptian either. (It’s faux-Catholic, for which I make no apologies…)

    • Thuloid

      I don’t disagree, but I hardly find Mesopotamian religion less moralistic. That seems a common ANE thing.

      • Cedric Ballbusch

        Not untrue. I suppose that prior to Zoroaster other faiths in the region appear far less concerned with individual redemption. Of course, we know very, very little about bronze and iron age religious practice; and virtually nothing about the beliefs of the non-elite individual adherent.

        • Thuloid

          That much seems to be true, though Zoroaster is a whole nother can of worms. It’s really hard to a) date Zoroaster’s life, b)establish exactly what pre-Zoroastrian Iranian religion looked like, c)differentiate that cleanly from early Zoroastrianism. We’ve got medieval texts presumably going back to 2nd-6th c. CE ones. Before that, lots of guesswork.

          I backed into this problem a few years ago in looking at Old Testament scholarship of a certain era that liked to attribute all dualistic ideas to Zoroastrian influence on early Judaism during the Persian period. Quickly discovered that the dates were all so fuzzy that ascribing influence in one direction or another is next to impossible. Iffy as it is, our textual and historical evidence for the development of Judaism is still an order of magnitude better than for Zoroastrianism.

          But I’m thinking of the intro to the Code of Hammurabi, where he says that he is a god-fearing prince whose job it is to punish the wicked and establish righteousness in the land. Or the even earlier Code of Ur-Nammu, where again the ruler is credited with, according to the word of a god, establishing right and punishing evil. It’s not individual redemption, but it is law and public morals described in terms of service to the gods. Presumably this sort of talk resonated enough with common folk that rulers had a propagandistic reason to advance it.

          • Common folk like it when their violence-wielding rulers promise to only kill people for peace?

          • Thuloid

            Indeed. To be fair, it’s possible this is even how the kings saw their roles. I don’t take it for granted that they were much less public-minded than today’s elected officials. But yes, rulers who promise to wield force against injustice are rewarded for that promise.

          • Cedric Ballbusch

            If it is anything to go by Enikdu’s vision of the Sumerian underworld is rather unpleasant. But it is also open to interpretation and the cultural context is unclear. Pharaonic religion offers, to the best of my knowledge, the first concrete promises of paradise. But so little is known about so many faiths, we can’t say that this vision was unique at the time.

            With the pronouncements of ancient kings I always wonder who the intended audience was.

          • Thuloid

            Right. It’s also one of the (two) earliest attested (in writing) religious systems in the world, so relative rarity is absurdly hard to judge. But most scholars have concluded that early Israelite (i.e., 1st temple period) beliefs on this matter were probably more like the Sumerian than the Pharaonic.

          • Cedric Ballbusch

            My understanding (and I could be wrong or out of date) is that archeology supports the idea that there was strong Sumerian cultural influence in the Levant. Depending on how we interpret the identity of the Hyksos, Egyptian cultural influence in the region is potentially nil until the 18th Dynasty.

            I would not disagree that Sheol has a distinctly Mesopotamian air to it.

  • Zab

    Geezus, who kicked the hornets nest? Glad to see one of you is alive. Though the ominous silence from the others can only mean trouble…

    • The Warlock

      I don’t know what everyone else is doing 🙁 I also don’t want the House to fade away, couple that with free time in the mornings and that gives me some time to hobby/blog. Really just want to bring more traffic/commenters back to the House

      • Thuloid

        I’ve got a bunch of material stacked up. As soon as I get back from a brief trip to NY, I’ll get a post up.

    • Dragons Claw

      We’re not up to nutin and if you was wise you’d not be asking no questions 😉

      • Zab

        You’re assumption there about me being wise is waaaay of base sir. I resemble that comet -_-

        • Zab

          ah f**k. auto correct! You win again – damn you!

    • Von

      I did the last two weeks and didn’t have anything intelligent to say this week. Barfing out content because it’s content day has never been my bag.

  • The Warlock

    I suppose it’s pertinent to mention the day after I post a Top X, PP comes out with a new edition >.>

    Put succinctly:

    THERE IS A NEW EDITION OF A GAME I DO NOT PLAY BUT IT LOOKS COOL BECAUSE GIANT ROBOTS. *has 50pts of Cryx sitting around doing sweet fuck all*

    • Thuloid

      I have some. Never really played much. I wonder what actual players think, but I wouldn’t mind seeing the game go back to a focus on jacks and beasts.

      • The Warlock

        Considering Cryx advice is to spam thralls, I’d hope it does :/

        • Thuloid

          That seems to be every faction. People look at the models and fall in love with the big guys (because who doesn’t want a game about mechs fighting giant werewolves?), and then learn it’s about gumming up the whole field with infantry and the big guys suck.

          • The Warlock

            That’s one of the turn-offs on WHM for me- it’s touted as watertight balance yet…it’s just as bad as GW for balance/non-optimal choices

          • Von

            I wonder who touts it as watertight balance?

            I tout it as having watertight mechanics. If you can be bothered to read the actual words on the page and work your way through the logical processes involved, WM/H executes near-perfectly every time. Balanced, though? Fuck no, never has been. And that problem with big guys is never going to go away until they radically change the way infantry units and victory conditions work.

            It should be noted that Mangled Metal/Tooth and Claw is a thing, though. If you like big beasts and you cannot lie, there is a mode of play for you. The player base just doesn’t like to talk about it because it’s not pick-up tourney-practice friendly. 😉

          • The Warlock

            The people who tout it as watertight balance are those who are more motivated about stealing GW people away from GW games. I dunno. If MkIII inspires me to paint da Cryx (which I’m getting less and less keen on as a faction) in the future, who knows.

            I still have 5 neverborn masters to get and a fuckton of more neverborn minis.