Tagged: Colour Theory

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[Colour Theory] Contrasting Achromatic

Sin City Neutral (Grey) and Near-Neutral Achromatics as well as Monochromatic paint schemes create lovely soft looks, but sometimes you want something to stand out. As I said at the start of this series, choose a paint theme to help...

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[Colour Theory] Monochromatic

Choose a Hue, add White, Black, GreyBurnetts Boards This colour scheme is similar to Achromatic (Greyscale) except a single colour is allowed. You can still Tint, (Highlight) Shade or Tone. (Grey) There aren’t many situations where you might use monochromatic...

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[Colour Theory] Near-Neutral Achromatic

Similar to Pure Achromatic (Greyscale) schemes, are Near-Neutrals. Since Grey is Neutral, Near-Neutrals are Colours that have so much grey (light or dark grey) that it’s almost impossible to tell what the original colour was. “Earthy” is another term given...

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[Colour Theory] Pure-Achromatic (Greyscale)

Remember when I said colours of equal value look like thesame shade of grey? Look at the Colour Wheel now. Achromatic Colours are Whites, Blacks and Greys. Greys are also known as Neutral because they have no colour. (Grey is...

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[Colour Theory] Colour Contrast and Context

Comparing light, dark and grey contrasts. http://facweb.cs.depaul.edu/sgrais/color_context.htm When we look at contrast, it means we’re looking at how strongly one colour appears compared to another. Specifically, when the 2 colours are painted next to each other. Advertising and websites pay...

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[Colour Theory] Square Tetradic Colours

I’ll be looking at two Tetradic Schemes – Rectangular and Square. In both, we use 2 sets of Complementary Colours for a total of 4 colours. The difference between Rectangular and Square is how far apart the colours are spread....

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[Colour Theory] Rectangular Tetradic Colours

I’ll be looking at two Tetradic Schemes – Rectangular and Square. In both, we use 2 sets of Complementary Colours for a total of 4 colours. The difference between Rectangular and Square is how far apart the colours are spread....

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[Colour Theory] Triadic Colours

Even Triadic: Orange-Red, Green and Blue Colours in the Triad are evenly spaced around the wheel. Together, these colours appear very vibrant. A benefit is that while these colours create a contrast, there’s still a harmony due to the even...

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[Colour Theory] Split-Complementary Colours

Main: Green, Split: Orange-Red & Red-Violet This colour scheme is similar to Complementary Colours, but instead of using the one directly opposite your main choice, it uses the two beside the complementary colour. You’ll share many of the benefits of the...

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[Colour Theory] Cool Colours

As discussed previously, Colour Temperature talks about how we perceive colours and their relation to others on the colour wheel. Directly, this means Green, Blue, Violet and all the colours in between. Indirectly, you can say that certain colours are...

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[Colour Theory] Warm Colours

HandPrint.com Colour Temperature talks about the appearance of colours and how they relate to each other on the colour wheel. Directly, this means Yellow, Orange, Red and all the colours in between. Indirectly, you can say that certain colours are...

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[Colour Theory] Analogous Colours

Main: Green-Yellow (Lime) Analogous: Green and Yellow Analogous Colours These colour schemes, often found in nature, are near each other on the colour wheel. They go together and blend naturally. I’m not talking about painting a model with just one colour...

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[Colour Theory] Complementary Colours

Complementary: Green and Red What we’re looking at here are colour opposites. Being opposites, they cause the other one to strongly stand out when the colours are next to each other or if a lot of one surrounds a small...